Tag Archives: Pope Benedict XVI

March 1

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Sober  Thought of the Day
“I have absolutely no pleasure in (alcohol) in which I sometimes so madly indulge. It has not been in the pursuit of pleasure that I have periled life and reputation and reason. It has been the desperate attempt to escape from torturing memories, from a sense of insupportable loneliness and a dread of some strange impending doom.”
Edgar Allan Poe

It’s true that in the end of my drinking days there was no pleasure in it. There was compulsion and repetition and daily drinking, but I could never drink enough to achieve the high drinking had given me in the beginning. Number 9

Psalm of the Day
Responsorial Psalm PS 105:16-17, 18-19, 20-21

R. (5a) Remember the marvels the Lord has done.

When the LORD called down a famine on the land
and ruined the crop that sustained them,
He sent a man before them,
Joseph, sold as a slave.
R. Remember the marvels the Lord has done.

They had weighed him down with fetters,
and he was bound with chains,
Till his prediction came to pass
and the word of the LORD proved him true.
R. Remember the marvels the Lord has done.

The king sent and released him,
the ruler of the peoples set him free.
He made him lord of his house
and ruler of all his possessions.
R. Remember the marvels the Lord has done.

Today’s Saint
“Liturgical action is given a more noble form when sacred rites are solemnized in song, with the assistance of sacred ministers and the active participation of the people.” Saint Cecilia, patron saint of musicians

February 23

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Sober Thought of the Day
Lapsing or relapsing is a process that begins a long time before the actual event. Because lapses and relapses don’t “just happen,” it is possible to identify the signs of impending trouble and head it off. If you learn how to spot the warning signs and make plans to act once you see them, you can stay on the road to recovery. Healing the Addicted Brain, Ch. 9

Sometimes a slip, or a relapse, can be headed off by utilizing a few of the tools available to us in recovery. Going to a meeting. Reading sobriety materials. Networking with sober people online. Talking with our sponsors. Praying. When we feel uncomfortable with things and we think a drink might be the solution, we can “play the tape” to remind us what the rest of the night will look like if we take that first drink. Number 9

Psalm of the Day
Responsorial Psalm PS 119:1-2, 4-5, 7-8

R. (1b) Blessed are they who follow the law of the Lord!

Blessed are they whose way is blameless,
who walk in the law of the LORD.
Blessed are they who observe his decrees,
who seek him with all their heart.
R. Blessed are they who follow the law of the Lord!

You have commanded that your precepts
be diligently kept.
Oh, that I might be firm in the ways
of keeping your statutes!
R. Blessed are they who follow the law of the Lord!

I will give you thanks with an upright heart,
when I have learned your just ordinances.
I will keep your statutes;
do not utterly forsake me.
R. Blessed are they who follow the law of the Lord!

Today’s Saint 
Hope is practiced through the virtue of patience, which continues to do good even in the face of apparent failure, and through the virtue of humility, which accepts God’s mystery and trusts him even at times of darkness. Faith tells us that God has given his Son for our sakes and gives us the victorious certainty that it is really true: God is love! It thus transforms our impatience and our doubts into the sure hope that God holds the world in his hands and that, as the dramatic imagery of the end of the Book of Revelation points out, in spite of all darkness he ultimately triumphs in glory. Pope Benedict XVI, God Is Love

February 20

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Sober Thought for the Day
“The attainment of greater humility is the foundation principle of each of AA’s Twelve Steps, for without some degree of humility, no alcoholic can stay sober at all. ”Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions, p. 70

I don’t learn humility in my head, through knowledge and study, or through reading about it.  Humility is fostered in my heart. An alcoholic living a sober life, and all that entails, is living a life of humility because in order to stay away from the drink, I have to remember who I am–an alcoholic. I have a flaw, a defect. I’m not perfect. That I cannot drink like other people is something I need to remind myself of each morning. Piling up days in sobriety can very easily lead me to complacency where I forget how alcohol affected me so many days, weeks, months or years ago. Daily I pray, Dear God, thank you for keeping me sober yesterday. Please keep me sober today. Number 9

Psalm of the Day
Responsorial Psalm 51:3-4, 12-13, 18-19

R. A heart contrite and humbled, O God, you will not spurn.

Have mercy on me, O God, in your goodness;
in the greatness of your compassion wipe out my offense.
Thoroughly wash me from my guilt
and of my sin cleanse me.
R. A heart contrite and humbled, O God, you will not spurn.

A clean heart create for me, O God,
and a steadfast spirit renew within me.
Cast me not out from your presence,
and your Holy Spirit take not from me.
R. A heart contrite and humbled, O God, you will not spurn.

For you are not pleased with sacrifices;
should I offer a burnt offering, you would not accept it.
My sacrifice, O God, is a contrite spirit;
a heart contrite and humbled, O God, you will not spurn.
R. A heart contrite and humbled, O God, you will not spurn.

Today’s Saint

There is something in humility which strangely exalts the heartSaint Augustine

February 14

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Sober Thought for the Day
Recovery is about connection, and we experience this connection through relationships of various kinds. We practice our spirituality through relationships. We practice living our program through our relationships. We cut off relationships with people who are not safe or who were our drinking buddies. We change people, places and things. We form new relationships. page 201, A Woman’s Guide to Recovery

When I first got sober, it was tough because my spouse was my drinking buddy. I had to learn how to live and relate with him on an entirely new playing field. This was tough, but not impossible. There were feelings of jealousy and self-pity when he would have a drink and I “couldn’t.”  I couldn’t end my relationship with my spouse, so I ended my attachment to the drinking side of our relationship.  Once I detached from the idea of drinking with my spouse, I was able to live independently of him and his drinking habits. Number 9

Psalm of the Day
Responsorial Psalm Ps 1:1-2, 3, 4 And 6

R. (40:5a) Blessed are they who hope in the Lord.

Blessed the man who follows not
the counsel of the wicked
Nor walks in the way of sinners,
nor sits in the company of the insolent,
But delights in the law of the LORD
and meditates on his law day and night.
R. Blessed are they who hope in the Lord.

He is like a tree
planted near running water,
That yields its fruit in due season,
and whose leaves never fade.
Whatever he does, prospers.
R. Blessed are they who hope in the Lord.

Not so the wicked, not so;
they are like chaff which the wind drives away.
For the LORD watches over the way of the just,
but the way of the wicked vanishes.
R. Blessed are they who hope in the Lord.

Today’s Saint
“I didn’t go to religion to make me happy. I always knew a bottle of Port would do that. If you want a religion to make you feel really comfortable, I certainly don’t recommend Christianity.” CS Lewis

“Are we not perhaps all afraid in some way? If we let Christ enter fully into our lives, if we open ourselves totally to him, are we not afraid that He might take something away from us? Are we not perhaps afraid to give up something significant, something unique, something that makes life so beautiful? Do we not then risk ending up diminished and deprived of our freedom? . . . No! If we let Christ into our lives, we lose nothing, nothing, absolutely nothing of what makes life free, beautiful and great. No! Only in this friendship are the doors of life opened wide. Only in this friendship is the great potential of human existence truly revealed. Only in this friendship do we experience beauty and liberation.” Pope Benedict XVI