February 13

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Sober Thought for the Day
We will know we are ready and willing for Step 8 when we can apologize to those who hurt us, when we don’t follow the philosophy of “an eye for an eye” and cross off the list those who have gotten revenge or those whom we feel “deserved” our ill treatment. This step is not about judging others. We need to pull back into our humility and learn to replace judgment with attitudes of mercy and forgiveness. Whether our “enemies” ask for it or not, it is our responsibility to forgive them in our hearts and then apologize for our wrongdoing. This is the only attitude that will lead to emotional resolution.The Twelve Step Journal, by Claudette Wassil-Grimm, p. 224-225

I am grateful to God today for his mercy. Not his justice. If I got what I deserved (justice), then I would be dead or in prison from drunk driving. I’d be divorced and unable to raise my children. I was hopeless, and now I am not. That can only be through God’s mercy. I have been the recipient of great mercy and grace. And I commit to show mercy, rather than justice, to all I come in contact today. Number 9

Psalm of the Day
Responsorial Psalm Ps 51:3-4, 5-6ab, 12-13, 14 And 17

R. (see 3a) Be merciful, O Lord, for we have sinned.

Have mercy on me, O God, in your goodness;
in the greatness of your compassion wipe out my offense.
Thoroughly wash me from my guilt
and of my sin cleanse me.
R. Be merciful, O Lord, for we have sinned.

For I acknowledge my offense,
and my sin is before me always:
“Against you only have I sinned,
and done what is evil in your sight.”
R. Be merciful, O Lord, for we have sinned.

A clean heart create for me, O God,
and a steadfast spirit renew within me.
Cast me not out from your presence,
and your Holy Spirit take not from me.
R. Be merciful, O Lord, for we have sinned.

Give me back the joy of your salvation,
and a willing spirit sustain in me.
O Lord, open my lips,
and my mouth shall proclaim your praise.
R. Be merciful, O Lord, for we have sinned.

Today’s Faith
“We are not the sum of our weaknesses and failures; we are the sum of the Father’s love for us and our real capacity to become the image of his Son.” (Pope John Paul II, Closing Homily, 5)

From The Divine Mercy web site summarizing JPII’s Encyclical on Mercy, “The Old Testament encourages people suffering from misfortune, especially those weighed down by sin — as also the whole of Israel, which had entered into the covenant with God — to appeal for mercy, and enables them to count upon it: it reminds them of His mercy in times of failure and loss of trust. Subsequently, the Old Testament gives thanks and glory for mercy every time that mercy is made manifest in the life of the people or in the lives of individuals. In this way, mercy is in a certain sense contrasted with God’s justice, and in many cases is shown to be not only more powerful than that justice but also more profound.

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